Consolidate gift cards with small balances to one card!

Those gift cards!  You received a few for Christmas, then your birthday and you aren’t sure where the others came from. You used them to make various purchases and  and found that you now have gift cards with a few dollars left on them?  Forget to use them or maybe you aren’t sure how much is left on the card?  You may be thinking that you will eventually use them but the amount is so small.  Well there may be a solution to this problem so you can make sure those balances don’t go to waste,  This solution really only works on gift cards with a credit card logo on them such as Visa, Mastercard or American Express.  Basically any card you can use at ANY store.

Consolidate gift cards into one card.
Consolidate gift cards into one card.

Note: You may have to REGISTER the card with the bank in order to use it, especially with American Express. So if the transaction doesn’t go through, you may have to call the issuing service and assign your name, address and phone number to the card. Make 100% sure they match your Amazon account.

  • Step 1: Gather all your old gift cards that still have small balances on them.  Get them all!
  • Step 2: If you don’t already have a Amazon account, sign up for a shopping cart.
  • Step 3: Go to the gift cards page on Amazon.com and select and email gift card.
  • Step 4: Grab one of your gift cards and call the # on the card (or use the web) to check the balance left on the card.
  • Step 5: Enter the amount left on the card into the box labelled “amount” in the Amazon E-mail gift card details box (.50 cents is the least amount it will take).
  • Step 6: Enter one of your own email addresses in the recipient email box.
  • Step 7: Click ‘add to order’ on the lower right.
    • Step 8: Click ‘proceed to checkout’ on the right side.
    • Step 9: Sign into your account when prompted.
    • Step 10: Under “more payment options“, select Add a Card and enter the card number, name and the expiration date for the gift card you just checked the balance of and click ‘continue.’
    • Step 11: Double check all the info and click ‘Place your order.’
    • Step 12: Wait for email with gift card claim code and copy the code to your computer clipboard.
    • Step 13: Go back to Amazon.com and then select ‘your account’ on the menu at the top.
    • Step 14: In the second area under ‘Gift Cards‘ select ‘apply a gift card to your account‘ and paste your claim code into the box and click ‘apply to your account.’
    • Step 15: Repeat steps 3-14 for each of the gift cards you collected that have small balances on them.

Now that you have all of these cards registered on Amazon you can now use the card to purchase at one place.  Once you receive the email from Amazon.com with your gift card claim code, throw away those old gift cards immediately.

While this may seem complicated, it’s really very easy.

Advertisements

What is a Good Credit Score?

Most credit scores operate within the range of 301 to 850. Within that range, there are different categories, from bad to excellent.

  • Excellent Credit: 781 – 850
  • Good Credit: 661-780
  • Fair Credit: 601-660
  • Poor Credit: 501-600
  • Bad Credit: below 500

But even these aren’t set in stone. That’s because lenders all have their own definitions of what is a good credit score. One lender that is looking to approve more borrowers might approve applicants with credit scores of 680 or higher. Another might be more selective and only approve those with scores of 750 or higher. Or both lenders might offer credit to anyone with a score of at least 650, but charge consumers with scores below 700 a higher interest rate!

The Credit Score Range Scale

There are many different credit scores available to lenders, and they each develop their own credit score range. Why is that important? Because if you get your credit score, you need to know the credit score range you are looking at so you understand where your number fits in.

The Credit Score Range Using Various Scoring Models:

  • FICO Score range: 300-850
  • VantageScore 3.0 range: 300–850
  • VantageScore scale (versions 1.0 and 2.0): 501–990
  • PLUS Score: 330-830
  • TransRisk Score: 100-900
  • Equifax Credit Score: 280–850

With all of the scores listed above, the higher the number the lower the risk. That means consumers with higher scores are more likely to get approved for credit, and to get the best interest rates when they do. And they are more likely to get discounts on insurance. What is considered a “high” score depends on what type of score is being used.

If your FICO score is 840, for example, you’re just 10 points shy of the highest score possible and your credit is “superprime.” But if you have an 840 VantageScore (using version 2.0), it’s not as spectacular because you’re 150 points away from the highest possible score.

What’s Your Score?

Don’t assume your score is good (or isn’t) just because you have always paid your bills on time (or haven’t.) The only way to know whether you have a good credit score is to check. You can get your credit score free once a month at Credit.com. This is a truly free credit score – no payment information is requested. In addition to the number, you’ll see a breakdown of the factors that affect your score and get recommendations for making your credit as strong as possible.

How Are Credit Scores Generated?

Credit scores compare factors like payment history, debt levels and the age of credit accounts to figure out what consumers who pay their bills on time have in common. The goal is to predict how new and existing customers will handle credit.

Ultimately then, a credit score summarizes the information in your credit report, which makes it easier and faster for a lender to process a loan application and make a determination as to how likely you are to pay back the loan in question.

The Benefits of a Good Credit Score

A good credit score will help you borrow money for a car or home, or open a credit card with a comparatively lower interest rate. That means you will pay less over time for the money.

Consider this: if you’re buying a $300,000 house with a 30 year fixed mortgage, and you have bad credit, then you could end up paying more than $90,000 more for that house over the life of the loan than if you had good credit.

So, in the end, it really pays to understand your credit scores and to make them as strong as possible.

Article by: Gerri Detweiler  Credit.com